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       Not only the wealth, but the independence and security of a country, appear to be materially connected with the prosperity of manufacturers.   Every nation ... ought to endeavor to possess within itself all the essentials of a national supply.  They comprise the means of subsistence, habitation, clothing and defense ... The expediency of encouraging manufactures in the United States, which was not long since deemed very questionable, appears at this time to be pretty generally admitted.   - Alexander Hamilton
 
   The great rule of conduct for us in regard to foreign nations is in extending our commercial relations, to have with them as little political connection as possible . . . It is our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances with any portion of the foreign world .                                    - George Washington
  
       The underlying purpose of the ... elites of 19th century British government ... was to preserve ... the interests of an exclusive private power ... concentrated in the hands of a tiny number of bankers and institutions of the City of London.

       Such free-trade manipulation has been the essence of British economic strategy for the past 150 years. Britain's genius has been a chameleon-like ability to adapt that policy to a shifting international economic reality. But the core policy has remained—Adam Smith's 'absolute free trade,' as a weapon against sovereign national economic policy of rival powers.

       By the end of the 19th century, the British establishment began an intense debate over how to maintain its global empire… Britain embarked on a more sophisticated and far more effective form for maintaining its dominant world role, through what came to be called 'informal empire.'

       While maintaining core imperial possessions in India and the Far East … British capital flowed … into Argentina, Brazil and the United States, to form bonds of financial dependence in many ways more effective than formal colonial titles.

       The notion of special economic relationships with 'client states,' the concept of 'spheres of influence' as well as that of 'balance-of ­power diplomacy,' all came out of this complex weave of British 'informal empire' towards the end of the last century.                                                      – William Engdahl
The Hamilton Journal

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